Dog owners queue up with their dogs at an office in Xiacheng District of Hangzhou, capital of East China’s Zhejiang Province to get dog ownership certificates. The city started the campaign on Thursday to reign in dog owners’ behavior, stipulating that without a permit, owners could face fines as high as 5,000 yuan ($720) per pet. Photo: IC

In a bid to crack down on unleashed dogs, Shanghai is considering grading residents on how they raise pets, and a poor score could affect their social credit points. 

Residents judged as bad dog owners could lose points on their personal social credit system, according to a statement received by the Global Times on Thursday from the Shanghai Public Security Bureau.

Shanghai police hope that using the system will curb frequent dog attacks in the city. 

A low social credit score could affect a person’s credit ceiling. In extreme cases, one could be listed as “laolai” or “a dishonest person” and face flight and train bans.

Details of the measure have yet to be finalized, the Shanghai Public Security Bureau said when reached by the Global Times on Thursday.

Tibetan Mastiff, English Bulldog and Japanese Tosa have been labeled ferocious dogs, and are not allowed in the city. 

Shanghai issued 135,800 dog registration certificates in 2019.

On June 19, an unleashed Alaskan Husky attacked a boy, leaving a 10 centimeter-long wound on his face, media reported. 

Previously, a Shanghai police official said dog tags will be embedded with electronic chips to better track their behavior. Dog owners may be put on a blacklist or whitelist depending on how their pet behaves, the Shanghai Morning Post reported in January. 

If dog owners frequently violate dog care regulations, they may be required to take a course or banned from keeping a dog, the official said. 

Other cities, including Foshan in South China’s Guangdong Province, are also considering including a person’s dog care record on the social credit system.  A dog owner’s score on the social credit system could be affected if they are punished more than three times within a year for violating dog regulations, the draft local regulation said.